Home | About IPJ | Editorial board | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | Contact us |   Login 
Industrial Psychiatry Journal
Search Articles   
    
Advanced search   
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 115-118

Perceived social support and life satisfaction in persons with somatization disorder


1 Department of Psychiatric Social Work, LGBRIMH, Tezpur, Assam, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, LGBRIMH, Tezpur, Assam, India
3 Department of Clinical Psychology, RINPAS, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
4 Department of Psychiatric Social Work, RINPAS, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India
5 Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatric Social Work, RINPAS, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India

Correspondence Address:
Arif Ali
Junior faculty /Psychiatric Social Work, Department of Psychiatry Social Work, LGB Regional Institute of Mental Health, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Govt. of India, Tezpur - 784001, Assam
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-6748.90342

Rights and Permissions

Background: Life satisfaction and perceived social support been shown to improve the well-being of a person and also affect the outcome of treatment in somatization disorder. The phenomenon of somatization was explored in relation to the perceived social support and life satisfaction. Aim: This study aimed at investigating perceived social support and life satisfaction in people with somatization disorder. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on persons having somatization disorder attending the outpatient unit of LGB Regional Institute of Mental Health, Tezpur, Assam. Satisfaction with life scale and multidimensional scale of perceived social support were used to assess life satisfaction and perceived social support respectively. Results: Women reported more somatic symptoms than men. Family perceived social support was high in the patient in comparison to significant others' perceived social support and friends' perceived social support. Perceived social support showed that a significant positive correlation was found with life satisfaction. Conclusion: Poor social support and low life satisfaction might be a stress response with regard to increased distress severity and psychosocial stressors rather than a cultural response to express psychological problems in somatic terms.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2638    
    Printed165    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded56    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal